29/09/2010

29/08/2010

St John the Evangelist

Email stjohntheevangelist@gmail.com

www.stjohnevang.co.uk

www.lpa24.org

0151 645 3314

Reg Charity 234025

Fr Frank Rice

Rev Philip White

22nd Sunday of the Year August 29th. 2010

FAITH IN FOCUS: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE

A woman spent 45 minutes in the queue for confession. As she was leaving the box she said to the priest, “Thank you, Father. With my sins forgiven I’m as pure as a newborn baby now.” The priest said to her, “That’s pride. Get back in the queue!”

There’s a lot of prejudice about pride and humility. Some people think that humility means soft-pedalling on the truth. So even though they may have won the Nobel Prize for Saving the World there are some people who feel that it’s somehow indecent to admit it. They should actually take pride in it.

This approach to humility often means that people fail to use their talents because they don’t want to be considered pushy. There are lots of parishes where excellent readers and musicians, organisers and volunteers, just remain quietly in their seats because they are reticent about using the God-given talents that they have.

And “God-given” is the operative phrase. For humility does not consist in being the shrinking violet in the room, or in acting like some unctuous Uriah Heap character, but in being proud to admit our qualities, but acknowledging where our gifts come from.

So humility is a type of pride in God, because humility means using our gifts and talents, being the real people we are, while at the same time giving glory to the source of all good things: God.

The actual word “humble” has nothing to do with “humble pie” (which is really “umble” or offal pie) but everything to do with “humus”, that good rich soil in which seeds can be planted and produce a rich crop. If a person is humble then they are more susceptible to the action of God working through them. So a humble person is one who is likely to produce lasting fruit. A humble person is one who makes things grow, one who is grounded.

Gloating in your own strengths leads to a fall; glorying in the gifts God has given you leads to praise. That’s why Jesus tells us today that those who exalt themselves will be humbled but those who humble themselves will be exalted. And that’s something to be proud of!

WORD OF GOD

Everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and the man who humbles himself will be exalted.

(Luke 14:11)

WORD FOR TODAY

In trying to exercise the virtue of humility we are not engaging in false modesty. We are simply recognising that all our gifts and talents come ultimately from God and it is to God that we should give the credit. To be humble is to be proud – of God.

Humility means willingly giving up your ‘rights’ in order to serve others; not grudgingly, but thankfully. It means that you consider it a privilege to give up your time, and resources, and energy for your brothers and sisters in Christ. It means that instead of walking around expecting everyone else to serve us, as if we deserved to be catered to, as if we had a right to have our needs met, instead we treat others as if they deserved to have us serve them. It means that we consider their needs and interests to be as important and urgent as ours, even more so. Humility is not condescension, reaching down to serve someone inferior to me. Humility is recognizing that, before God, we are all of equal worth. (Alan Perkins)

22nd Sun 29th. 5.30

10am.

8pm.

Graham Boden

Parishioners

Prayer Meeting

Mon 30th. 9.15 Christine Murphy
Tues 31`st 9.15 Mary & Sid Havard
Wed 1st 9.15 John Ryan
Thurs 2nd. 7.15 Ann Ferguson
Fri 3rd. 9.15 Kate Kenny
23rd.Sun 5th. 5.30

10am

8pm

Parishioners

Eileen Markey

Prayer meeting

Please pray for our sick and those who care for them

Eileen Markey, Joan Lee, Ann Ferguson, Frida Owens, Denis Welch, Josie Cohen, Peter Williamson, Kathy Smith, Marjorie Hoey, Mrs H McCormack, Esther Roche, Fay Challoner, Sheila Stockley, Joan & Charles Reynolds, Mollie Dowling, Kath Holland, Sheila Clayson, Mary Bryden, Owen & Josie Toohey, Betty Kennedy, Helen Worth, Christopher Hadfield, Ivan Gregory, Vincent Sarson, Kath Bassett , Pat Ronan, Christopher & Raymond McNally , Mark Harrison & Genevieve Foster. Those in the parish who do not wish their illness to be made public but who also need our prayers

Money Matters-Thank you

Sunday Offering £621 14p p

Boiler £70

120 Club Winner No 69 N Evans£ 20

This weekend, you have the opportunity of contributing towards the relief for the Pakistani floods victims through CAFOD . The disaster is on an unprecedented scale and has been described by the UN as a slow moving tsunami in which at least 1600 people have died and another 20 million have been displaced. Donating through CAFOD is a tax efficient way of making your contribution. This collection is an extra one and the harvest collection will be made as usual. Envelopes are available at the back of the church

Last Thursday, Fr Dennis celebrated his birthday. You have all made him feel very welcome here and he regards you as another family which is a testament to you. He leaves us on the 8th September to resume his studies but God willing he will come back to join us at Christmastide. I would also like to thank you all for the many lovely/funny cards I received on the occasion of my 82nd birthday and the thoughtful gifts and also for the cakes that were made for the pair of us. I can assure you that the house has been ringing with laughter for weeks.

God doesn’t cause trouble and adversity, but he uses trouble to refine some humility in us. While trouble causes some people to raise their faces to heaven and become bitter, others bow their knees before God and become better. (David Dykes)

Pride is not so much bragging as it is the illusion that I am at the centre and can manage everything on my own without help. Bragging may be a symptom of pride, but pride itself is much deeper. Even very insecure people who would never be caught dead bragging can demonstrate an amazing amount of pride.Humility, therefore, is the opposite of this attitude. It’s not a self deprecating sort of thing, humility is just living in the truth about ourselves… and the truth is I am not God, I’m not the centre, I have needs, I have things I can’t control, I am dependant on God. That’s humility.

(Rick Thiessen)

BILLIONS

A billion seconds ago it was 1979.

A billion minutes ago St John had only recently died.

A billion hours ago our ancestors were in the Stone Age.

A billion days ago nothing with two feet walked our earth.

A billion years ago seems just like a second in God’s mind.

And he was there!

Tuesday 31st.

11am-1pm

Teresa Young

Colette Corkhill

Thursday 2nd.

11am-1pm

Phil Topping

Gerry Topping

Saturday 4th.

11am-1pm

Anne Keogh

Chris Dougherty

‘The Missionaries of Divine Revelation are coming to The Carmelite Monastery on Sunday 5th September at 7pm to give a presentation on the remarkable story of the Apparition of the Virgin Mary in Rome (1947) at Tre Fountaine. All are welcome. Call Rachel on 07770266679 for further details or see poster at the back of the church’

AIDAN (August 31st)

St Aidan of Lindisfarne was born in Ireland and may have studied at Inish Cathay under St. Senan, the Irish missionary, before becoming a monk on the island of Iona, off the west coast of Scotland. At the request of King Oswald of Northumbria, Aidan went as a bishop to Lindisfarne, sometimes known as Holy Island, and was renowned throughout the kingdom for his knowledge of the bible, his learning and his eloquent preaching. His reputation for holiness is legendary as are his preference for simplicity, his kindness to the poor, and the miracles attributed to him. A contemporary of St Bede who speaks highly of his gifts as a bishop, he founded a monastery at Lindisfarne that became known as the English Iona and was a centre of learning and missionary activity for all of northern England. He died in 651 at Bamburgh Castle.

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22/08/2010

23/08/2010

St John the Evangelist
Email stjohntheevangelist@gmail.com
http://www.stjohnevang.co.uk
http://www.lpa24.org
0151 645 3314
Reg Charity 234025
Fr Frank Rice
Rev Philip White

21st Sunday of the Year August 22nd. 2010

FAITH IN FOCUS: DO YOU BELIEVE IN HELL?
In medieval times there was a lot of emphasis on hell. You only have to look at much of the art which has survived to this day and you will see paintings of the Last Judgement abound with the Devil’s helpers herding the souls of the damned into all sorts of awful punishments. The fronts of many a European cathedral would not be complete without scenes intended to shock the passer-by. But today we hear very little about hell.
It’s rather embarrassing for us these days. We don’t like to talk about it and we hardly ever hear anyone preach about it. In religious terms it simply isn’t politically correct. So it comes as a bit of nuisance when our liturgy devotes the whole of the gospel today to the concept of hell.
We’re quick off the mark to point out that we cannot takes Jesus’ words literally about fire, brimstone, weeping and gnashing of teeth. The idea of someone being prodded by a fork and roasting on a fire is probably not what Jesus had in mind anyway.
So we tend then to opt for the metaphorical approach to hell. We speak about the gospel statements not as physical descriptions but as symbolic ways of describing the reality of being separated from God and knowing that we have made our final choice.
But then some people try to point out that if God is loving then would he ever condemn anyone to eternal punishment? But unfortunately this would be to overrule our freewill. What if someone really wanted to be in hell? Would God stop them and intervene? Wouldn’t this make them little better than robots with no ability to choose?
Finally, we end up positing hell as complete annihilation. People who don’t achieve heaven, this argument goes, are simply eternally obliterated rather than punished because the prospect of eternal punishment is too horrific for God.
Uncomfortable though it is, we have to accept the fact that it is possible for men and women to experience God and to make a deliberate, informed, conscious decision to reject the goodness and holiness of what God is calling us to. And it is not possible to hear today’s gospel and come up with a sugar-daddy God who simply overrides human freedom and autonomy.
So do you believe in hell or not? And which one do you (not) believe in?

WORD OF GOD
Try your best to enter by the narrow door, because, I tell you, many will try to enter and will not succeed.
(Luke 13:24)

WORD FOR TODAY
Christianity is not a club; it’s the way the Church follows Christ. Yet we can’t put restrictions on how God in Christ will view those who do not choose to follow Jesus or who know nothing about him. Nor can we be complacent about our right of entry into the kingdom of heaven.

MOTHER AND SON (August 27th and 28th)
Sts Monica and Augustine reflect the pains that many a mother and son undergo, even today. Monica wanted the best for her bright and gifted son. He managed to have a good career but a terrible personal life. She watched as he had woman after woman, eventually making her a grandmother but not a mother-in-law. She never ceased praying for him. Imagine her joy when Augustine met St Ambrose who was Bishop of Milan, and in 387 was baptised in his thirties. But her joy was short-lived. As she was about to go home to north Africa with her son, she fell ill just before embarking at the Roman port of Ostia and died. Augustine tells us that among her last words was the following remarkable piece of advice: “You will bury your mother here. All I ask of you is that, wherever you may be, you should remember me at the altar of the Lord. Do not fret because I am buried far from our home in Africa. Nothing is far from God, and I have no fear that he will not know where to find me, when he comes to raise me to life at the end of the world.”
We need to rid our minds of the medieval caricature of Satan. Dispensing with the horns, the hooves, and the tail, we are left with the biblical portrait of a spiritual being, highly intelligent, immensely powerful and utterly unscrupulous. Jesus himself not only believed in his existence, but warned us of his power. He called him ‘the prince of this world,’ much as Paul called him ‘the ruler of the kingdom of the air’. He has therefore a throne and a kingdom, and under his command is an army of malignant spirits who are described in Scripture as ‘the powers of this dark world,’ and ‘the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms’.
(John Stott)

Assumption
Sun
22nd.
5.30
10am.
8pm.
Parishioners
Benefactors SSCF
Prayer Meeting
Mon
23rd.
9.15
John Ryan
Tues
24th.
9.15
Michael Brannock
Wed
25th.
9.15
Sick of parish
Thurs
26th.
7.15
Monica Callow
Fri
27th.
9.15
Kay Mcleod
Sun
29th.
5.30
10am
8pm
Graham Boden
Parishioners
Prayer Meeting
Please pray for our sick and those who care for them
Joan Lee, Ann Ferguson, Frida Owens, Denis Welch, Josie Cohen, Peter Williamson, Kathy Smith, Marjorie Hoey, Mrs H McCormack, Esther Roche, Fay Challoner, Sheila Stockley, Joan & Charles Reynolds, Mollie Dowling, Kath Holland, Sheila Clayson, Mary Bryden, Owen & Josie Toohey, Betty Kennedy, Helen Worth, Christopher Hadfield, Ivan Gregory, Vincent Sarson, Kath Bassett , Pat Ronan, Christopher & Raymond McNally , Mark Harrison & Genevieve Foster. Those in the parish who do not wish their illness to be made public but who also need our prayers

Money Matters-Thank you
Sunday Offering £699 29 p
Boiler £0
120 Club Winner No 81 E Wall £ 20

Congratulations to Dave Kenny who will receive his Bene Merenti medal at this Saturday’s mass in recognition of his long years of service in the SVP society. We will be toasting his achievement with a glass of bubbly and a piece of cake after mass. All are welcome- I can say that as it is also my 82nd birthday!!!!

There is to be a retreat day at St Joseph’s Parish centre on 9th October from 10am until 4pm. The title of the day is Testimony and the retreat will be given by Noel & Aiden Byrne. Facilities are limited it is a ticketed event. The cost is £ 6 and tickets may be obtained via Rosemary Larkin 645 9814

BARTHOLOMEW (August 24th)
Did you know…?
Bartholomew is the same person as Nathaniel in the gospels.
It is likely that Bartholomew (Son of Ptolemy) was really his surname.
In Rome, to call someone “Bartolomeo” means that they are a bit dim.
In the middle of the River Tiber there is an island with a hospital dedicated to St Bartholomew.
A man who was cured in this hospital returned to London and founded a hospital in 1123, and named it after St Bartholomew. We know it as Bart’s.

We have become so convinced that we have all sorts of rights that no one has the authority to take away, like the right to offend others but not be offended by them, the right to free healthcare and prescriptions, a right to not be bothered by someone smoking a cigarette, and so on. All these supposed “rights” lead us to an entitlement mentality by which we have actually become convinced that we are entitled to be in Heaven because God created us and that, whether we believe in him or not, he is obligated to let us be in there because we think it would be wrong for him to not let us in. And since we think Heaven is OK, but Hell is wrong, God is not allowed to have a Hell, but if he decides to have one anyway, he is forbidden by human sensibilities from ever sending us there.
(Austin Mansfield)

‘The Missionaries of Divine Revelation are coming to The Carmelite Monastery on Sunday 5th September at 7pm to give a presentation on the remarkable story of the Apparition of the Virgin Mary in Rome (1947) at Tre Fountaine. All are welcome. Call Rachel on 07770266679 for further details or see poster at the back of the church’

Hell is a place, a time and a consciousness in which there is no love. (Richard Bach)

For all students as they plan their futures following exam results; that they will receive sound guidance and advice from family and friends. But no matter what your results, if you tried your best then no one can ask for more.

St John’s Bereavement Support Group will be holding a coffee morning on the SECOND Monday of EVERY month, starting on the 13th September 10am-12 noon, in the Parish Centre. Please come along for a chat and support each other – EVERYONE welcome.
After a recent bereavement you may feel you would like to talk with someone. Please contact the presbytery by telephone or email and a member of the Group will get in touch with you.

Tuesday 24th.
11am-1pm
Teresa Young
Colette Corkhill
Thursday 26th.
11am-1pm
Noelene Evans
Rosemary Larkin
Saturday 28h.
11am-1pm
D Humphrey
W Humphrey

15/08/2010

15/08/2010

St John the Evangelist

Email stjohntheevangelist@gmail.com

www.stjohnevang.co.uk

www.lpa24.org

0151 645 3314

Reg Charity 234025

Fr Frank Rice

Rev Philip White

The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. August 15th. 2010

FAITH IN FOCUS: MAGNIFICAT

Mary’s song for today’s feast of the Assumption is called the Magnificat and is based on an Old Testament song by Hannah. But the song is not actually about Hannah or Mary. It’s about God and it’s about you and me. The word “Magnificat” means that I am praising God for his greatness.

Mary was blessed because the Lord was with her. Everyone with whom God dwells is blessed, and you are one of those people. Christ dwells with you. He has given you faith to believe in him. He has done everything necessary for your salvation. He talks to you, through his word. He feeds you, with his body and blood. God watches over you and protects you until the day he calls you to be with him. All generations can most certainly call you blessed. You are blessed because Jesus is with you, and he always will be. So with Mary as our example we too can sing the Magnificat.

What are the great things that the Lord has done for me that I want to burst into song about and sing Magnificat? What have I done that needs God’s mercy and how do I feel the forgiveness of God? What are the ways that God shows he is working in my life, with the power of his arm, and which make me want to sing Magnificat? Time and time again God stops me from getting proud-hearted, Magnificat! The God who thwarts the high and mighty and raises the common and garden folk, this same God never ignores me when I stand before him with honesty of heart, Magnificat! He fills me when I am hungry and he laughs at my false claims to be needy, Magnificat! Through my baptism God has promised that I will be his child and he will be my Father, until that day when I shall see him face to face, Magnificat!

Today’s feast represents the crowning glory of Mary’s life of faith lived in the hope and trust that the promises made to her would be fulfilled. By singing the Magnificat Mary shows that she had a deep understanding of God’s continual presence at her side in good times and in bad, and that her gratitude was such that her heart overflowed with praise just at the thought of what God was doing in her life.

By making the Magnificat our own, we too can recognise a God who has favoured his lowly servant; we can show our gratitude to God for the many ways in which his love surrounds us daily; and we can hope and trust in his promise that, like Mary, we will one day see him face to face and praise him for eternity with the saints in heaven. Magnificat!

WORD OF GOD

From this day forward all generations will call me blessed, for the Almighty has done great things for me.

(Luke 1:48)

WORD FOR TODAY

Mary already shares in her Son’s victory over sin and death. As we rejoice at her glory in heaven we pray that one day we may be found worthy to join her there in praising God with all his saints and angels.

SPIRITUAL STRUGGLE (August 20th)

You could be forgiven for thinking that saints have it easy. Yet the following prayer of St Bernard, whose feast is today, shows that even the greatest have to struggle.

Come, Lord Jesus, take away the scandals from your kingdom, which is my soul, and reign there, you who alone have the right. For greediness comes to claim a throne within me; haughtiness and self-assertion would rule over me; pride would be my king; lust says “I will reign”; ambition, detraction, envy and anger struggle within me for the mastery.

I resist as far as I am able; I struggle according as help is given me; I call on my Lord Jesus; for his sake I defend myself, since I acknowledge myself as wholly his possession. He is my God, him I proclaim my Lord; I have no other king than my Lord Jesus Christ. Come then, O Lord, and disperse these enemies by your power, and you shall reign in me, for you are my king and my God. Amen.

We pronounce, declare and define it to be a divinely revealed dogma: that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory.

(Pope Pius XII, proclaiming the dogma in 1950)

Assumption

Sun

15th. 5.30

10am.

8pm.

Private Int.

Parishioners

Prayer Meeting

Mon 16th. 9.15

12.00

Graham Buden

Funeral Mass (Clare Owens)

Tues 17th. 9.15 Sr Frances Quinn
Wed 18th. 9.15 Joan Bird
Thurs 19th. 7.15 Dot & Wilf Humphrey
Fri 20th. 9.15 Monica Callow
Sun 22nd. 5.30

10am

8pm

Parishioners

Benefactors SSCF

Prayer Meeting

Please pray for our sick and those who care for them

Joan Lee, Ann Ferguson, Frida Owens, Denis Welch, Josie Cohen, Peter Williamson, Kathy Smith, Marjorie Hoey, Mrs H McCormack, Esther Roche, Fay Challoner, Sheila Stockley, Joan & Charles Reynolds, Mollie Dowling, Kath Holland, Sheila Clayson, Mary Bryden, Owen & Josie Toohey, Betty Kennedy, Helen Worth, Christopher Hadfield, Ivan Gregory, Vincent Sarson, Kath Bassett , Pat Ronan, Christopher & Raymond McNally , Mark Harrison & Genevieve Foster. Those in the parish who do not wish their illness to be made public but who also need our prayers

Money Matters-Thank you

Sunday Offering £922.64 p

Boiler £3

120 Club Winner No 91 P White £ 20

The Universe requires an addition to its editorial team to work with the production team which includes The Catholic Times and other Catholic periodicals and magazines. Experienced or trainee. The base is in Cheadle Hulme. Email joseph.kelly@totalcatholic.com for details and address to send CV

There is to be a retreat day at St Joseph’s Parish centre on 9th October from 10am until 4pm. The title of the day is Testimony and the retreat will be given by Noel & Aiden Byrne. Facilities are limited it is a ticketed event. The cost is £ 6 and tickets may be obtained via Rosemary Larkin 645 9814

The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin is a singular participation in her Son’s resurrection and an anticipation of the resurrection of other Christians. “In giving birth you kept your virginity; in your Dormition (falling asleep) you did not leave the world, O Mother of God, but were joined to the source of Life. You conceived the living God and, by your prayers, will deliver our souls from death.”

(No. 966 of Catechism of Catholic Church)

All the feast days of Mary mark the great mysteries of her life and her part in the work of redemption. The central mystery of her life and person is her divine motherhood, celebrated both at Christmas and a week later (Jan. 1) on the feast of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. The Immaculate Conception (Dec. 8) marks the preparation for that motherhood, so that she had the fullness of grace from the first moment of her existence, completely untouched by sin. Her whole being throbbed with divine life from the very beginning, readying her for the exalted role of Mother of the Saviour. The Assumption completes God’s work in her since it was not fitting that the flesh that had given life to God himself should ever undergo corruption. The Assumption is God’s crowning of his work as Mary ends her earthly life and enters eternity. The feast turns our eyes in that direction, where we will follow when our earthly life is over. (Clifford Stevens)

On Monday at noon, we shall be celebrating the funeral mass for Clare Owens. Please remember her in your prayers and her husband Dave, and children Stephen, David and Joanne. May she rest in peace.

Appeal for Disasters Emergency Committee’s work for the people affected by Pakistan floods: Tuesday 17th August 2010 from 10am there will be a Coffee Morning at 46 Woodyear Road., including. Bring and Buy table – books, plants, unwanted gifts, . Questions? Call Nicole 327 1621

Tuesday 17th.

11am-1pm

Colette Sarson

Margaret Brannock

Thursday 19th.

11am-1pm

Kevin Fitzpatrick

Nora McCormick

Saturday 21st.

11am-1pm

Anne Keogh

Chris Dougherty

DAY OF RECKONING

No, it’s not the Last Judgment, just the results of the exams. But if you’re waiting for your results then it might as well be a visit from the Grim Reaper!

We wish good luck to all the students of our parish who’ve taken public exams. We hope you were able to show the examiners how clever you really are, and that those of you wanting to go off to college and university will get the right grades.

But no matter what your results, if you tried your best then no one can ask for more. So don’t take any flak from those older brothers or sisters who keep reminding you how they got 47 grade A stars. Just remind them that there’s more knowledge in the world than when they were at school, so things were easier for them!

01/08/2010

01/08/2010

St John the Evangelist

Email stjohntheevangelist@gmail.com

www.stjohnevang.co.uk

www.lpa24.org

0151 645 3314

Reg Charity 234025

Fr Frank Rice

Rev Philip White

18th.Sunday of the Year 1st August 2010

FAITH IN FOCUS: WHAT’S THE POINT?

Vanity of vanities!” is a famous quotation from the bible, but what does it mean? It’s the preacher’s way in the Book of Ecclesiastes of saying that life seems “meaningless” or “pointless”. What’s it all about? It’s certainly not fair and it seems to take all my time and energy and keep me to the grindstone.

A radio pundit the other day said that there should be more love shown in the work place, because love makes us more productive and that way we will earn more money. Is that the point of life, money? And what’s the point of stashing money away when your children and grandchildren will only fritter it away after you’ve gone? Is it worth the hard work and the restless nights worrying about it, asks our reading today?

There’s nothing fundamentally wrong with our world; God made it and it’s good. But if we limit our sights only to the things of this world then we won’ see very far. We’ll get bogged down in its limitations; our lives will not reflect anything other than our career prospects, our bank balances, our reputations and our comfort. Our cultural horizons will hit the buffers at celebrity, gossip, fashion and trivia, while our significant relationships will be virtually found on Facebook and Twitter.

What makes us tick? What are our values and are any of them transcendent? Do they go beyond the make-up and greasepaint, beyond simply following the crowd in its dream of success?

The preacher in today’s scripture obviously feels that life can be meaningless unless we have a clear idea about the reason we are on this earth. Without such a spiritual compass we are at the whim of a pointless merry-go-round that seems to take more out of us than it gives.

So what’s the driving force in your life? What makes you want to jump out of bed in the morning and confront the world and all its challenges? What motivates you to keep on going and to make your mark? Given that life is short, what makes it worth living? When today’s psalmist came to answer these questions, he put it very simply: Make us know the shortness of our life/that we may gain wisdom of heart/O Lord, you have been our refuge/from one generation to the next.

For life to be meaningful we all need a goal. What’s yours?

WORD OF GOD

Vanity of vanities, the Preacher says. Vanity of vanities. All is vanity!

(Ecclesiastes 1:2)

WORD FOR TODAY

Do you ever feel that there’s got to be more to life than meets the eye? Living, working, earning, saving, spending…is this what it’s all about? Or is there some deeper meaning and purpose to our time on earth? That’s the question which Ecclesiastes asks us today.

SOMETHING TO PRAY ABOUT…

We can join Pope Benedict in his prayer intentions for the month of August:

General:

That those who are without work or homes or who are otherwise in serious need may find understanding and welcome, as well as concrete help in overcoming their difficulties.

Missionary:

That the Church may be a home for all people, ready to open its doors to anyone suffering from racial or religious discrimination, hunger, or wars that force them to emigrate to other countries.

BILLIONS

A billion seconds ago it was 1979.

A billion minutes ago St John had only recently died.

A billion hours ago our ancestors were in the Stone Age.

A billion days ago nothing with two feet walked our earth.

A billion years ago seems just like a second in God’s mind.

And he was there!

18th Sunday 1st. 5.30

10.00

8pm

Philomena Heaney

Parishioners

Prayer meeting

Mon .2nd. 9.15 Pauline Prosser
Tues 3rd. 9.15 Joe & Mgt. Carr
Wed 4th. 9.15 Hannah O’Neill
Thurs 5th. 7.15 Greg Patten
Fri 6th. 9.15 Joan Lee
18th Sunday 8th. 5.30

10.00

8pm

Kate Kenny

Parishioners

Prayer Meeting

Please pray for our sick and those who care for them

Joan Lee, Ann Ferguson, Frida Owens, Denis Welch, Josie Cohen, Peter Williamson, Kathy Smith, Marjorie Hoey, Mrs H McCormack, Esther Roche, Fay Challoner, Sheila Stockley, Joan & Charles Reynolds, Mollie Dowling, Kath Holland, Sheila Clayson, Mary Bryden, Owen & Josie Toohey, Betty Kennedy, Helen Worth, Christopher Hadfield, Ivan Gregory, Vincent Sarson, Kath Bassett , Pat Ronan, Christopher & Raymond McNally , Mark Harrison & Genevieve Foster. Those in the parish who do not wish their illness to be made public but who also need our prayers

Money Matters-Thank you

Sunday Offering £ 712 63p

Retiring collection 3139 33p

Boiler £0

120 Club Winner No £ 20

“St John’s Bereavement Support Group will be holding a coffee morning on the SECOND Monday of EVERY month, starting on the 13th September 10am-12 noon, in the Parish Centre. Please come along for a chat and support each other – EVERYONE welcome.  Details Ann Murray 645 5514”.

“St John’s Bereavement Support Group. After a recent bereavement you may feel you would like to talk with someone.  Please contact the presbytery by telephone or email and a member of the Group will get in touch with you.”

OLD AND NEW FEAST (August 6th)

Most Christians know that today’s feast of the Transfiguration celebrates that mountain-top moment when three of Jesus’ disciples were privileged to see him presented in all his glory, talking with Moses and Elijah.

However, this feast was almost certainly assigned today’s date to take the place of an ancient pagan nature feast at the height of summer. Some suggest that the full-flowering rose was hailed on this day, while others speak of the exaltation of wine.

So it’s not surprising that there are stories of the pope crushing a bunch of grapes into the chalice on the Transfiguration or using new wine for the celebration of Mass. Even today raisins are blessed in Rome on this feast and the Greeks and Russians use it to bless grapes and other fruits.

Behind every feast there’s a story!

Let us treasure up in our soul some of those things which are permanent…, not of those which will forsake us and be destroyed, and which only tickle our senses for a little while. (Gregory of Nazianzus)

An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit. (Pliny the Younger)

Much of our activity these days is nothing more than a cheap anaesthetic to deaden the pain of an empty life.

(Suzette Hohrmann)

HOLIDAYS

August sees so many comings and goings with people off on holiday. As everyone’s routine changes a bit it’s possible for some of the vulnerable in our parish to be overlooked: the person you usually see down at the shops, the pensioner collecting her money at the post office, the man with the dog at the park…Keep an eye out for each other!

Holidays are one of the best tonics we can have. A change of scenery, a taste of different food and a couple of weeks in another setting can do wonders for our regeneration. And of course, we don’t even have to go away to have a holiday. All we have to ensure is that we take a break from the usual routine, from the things which normally occupy our time.

Recreation isn’t simply about lying on a beach. It can be about climbing mountains or walking till we drop. Recreation means creating again, and positive recreation means any form of activity, strenuous or relaxing, which recharges our batteries and makes us once again able to function on all pistons.

So whether you go away or stay at home, keep your eyes open!